About

Emily Hynes is an American musicologist and soprano. Her research is currently on black women’s musicking in prisons of the American South from 1933-1940. As a scholar, Emily has committed to telling stories of marginalized persons, with an added emphasis in carceral studies and prisoners’ stories. Her scholarly pursuits have been funded by the Andrew W Mellon Foundation, the Ronald E. McNair Program, the James W Pruett Foundation, and the Royster Society of Fellows at UNC Chapel-Hill. She has worked in conjunction with the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, St. Olaf College in Northfield, MN, the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, and with the Library of Congress. 

Emily has presented at various conferences, including those at the Insititute for the Digital Humanities (2016) and Harvard University (2019). Her presentations include curated exhibits, including her digital and on-site contributions to “The Musical Geography of 1920’s Paris” exhibit at the Alliance Fran├žaise in Minneapolis, MN. Her work in digital humanities has spanned several of her research projects, and she has previously served as a team member on several projects at musicalgeography.org. Mainly, Emily has created considerable contributions in digital mapping, creating a digital map story of 3,000 Ballets Russes performances and over 1,500 sound recordings from John Lomax and Herbert Halpert’s field recording trips. Narratives are also important to Emily’s work, as she has told the stories of dozens of women in the Russian gulag system through MapJournals and StoryMaps.

When not working on her research, Emily serves as the co-chair of the Carolina Symposia of Music and Culture and teaches voice at the UNC Community Music School. In a different vein, Emily serves as a fitness instructor through the UNC Health Care and Hospital system. 

Links: 

CV

About

Emily Hynes is an American musicologist and soprano. Her research is currently on black women’s musicking in prisons of the American South from 1933-1940. As a scholar, Emily has committed to telling stories of marginalized persons, with an added emphasis in carceral studies and prisoners’ stories. Her scholarly pursuits have been funded by the Andrew W Mellon Foundation, the Ronald E. McNair Program, the James W Pruett Foundation, and the Royster Society of Fellows at UNC Chapel-Hill. She has worked in conjunction with the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, St. Olaf College in Northfield, MN, the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, and with the Library of Congress. 

Emily has presented at various conferences, including those at the Insititute for the Digital Humanities (2016) and Harvard University (2019). Her presentations include curated exhibits, including her digital and on-site contributions to “The Musical Geography of 1920’s Paris” exhibit at the Alliance Fran├žaise in Minneapolis, MN. Her work in digital humanities has spanned several of her research projects, and she has previously served as a team member on several projects at musicalgeography.org. Mainly, Emily has created considerable contributions in digital mapping, creating a digital map story of 3,000 Ballets Russes performances and over 1,500 sound recordings from John Lomax and Herbert Halpert’s field recording trips. Narratives are also important to Emily’s work, as she has told the stories of dozens of women in the Russian gulag system through MapJournals and StoryMaps.

When not working on her research, Emily serves as the co-chair of the Carolina Symposia of Music and Culture and teaches voice at the UNC Community Music School. In a different vein, Emily serves as a fitness instructor through the UNC Health Care and Hospital system. 

Links: 

CV

Calendar

Upcoming

“Dreaming and Signified Spatial Relationships: A Cultural Ecology of American Southern Prison Music 1933-1940” Society for American Music Annual Meeting, March 2020

Blog

A Musicologist Trying to Crowdsource

This week, as we tackle crowdsourcing in digital art history projects, I’m still at a loss for how the crowd mentality can work in musicology. As most academics in msuicology who need transcriptions do them themselves or pay someone else, I’m unfamiliar with cases of widespread public textual transctiption for msuicological purposes. Moreover, musical transcription …